Literary Updates in Quarantine: James Mumford’s “Vexed”

To say this page hasn’t been updated in a while is quite the understatement.

Projects suspended, ideas deferred — all in the service of focusing on more immediate tasks. This isn’t to say there hasn’t been a lot on my mind lately: I’m studying new languages; I’m acquiring design skills; I’ve abandoned my insipid verse.

And this pathogen has been no obstacle to progress. Sure, I am prone to the rabbit holes of YouTube and gaming as much as anyone. But there are few better ways of isolating myself than unraveling the mysteries of a book — or, in my case, a pile of them. To name some examples: Samuel Johnson’s Rasselas, Murasaki Shikibu’s The Tale of Genji, Albert Camus (no, not The Plague!).

Yet, I have not merely read from afar; in one case, I have helped in the process.

For I have been fortunate to work as an assistant (along with Rick Yoder, a friend) for Dr. James Mumford, my former teacher at the University of Virginia.

And his latest book, Vexed, is now available in the United States.

2016, polarization, the rise of outsider positions — on both sides of the Pond, there has been a significant shift in the nature of “politics as usual.” These issues, however, only scratch the surface. Is it time, then, to uphold the standard platforms of Left and Right? Or is it time to find a way to reframe the debate entirely?

For those interested in current events, social issues, and/or public philosophy, this may be the book for you.

Buy directly from Bloomsbury, and add it to your at-home reading list today.

(For questions regarding Vexed, please contact Mumford and/or his representatives. But if there’s a need for a freelance editor or other related services, please feel free to contact for more information.)


Note: The full range of views expressed in Vexed and other linked sites are solely those of the author(s). Tatiana Lozano’s related work is on a personal basis and does not necessarily represent the views of any affiliated employers/groups/etc. — past, present, or future.

(Image credits: Custom illustration by Tatiana Lozano; photo by Andy Feliciotti via Unsplash)